Peach Blueberry Pie

Make 11, Week 7

Another pie out of the Art of the Pie book. It’s been fun baking my way through this book because there are some combos I’d never expect. Peach blueberry was good but probably at the top of my list.

This crust was made a couple week ago with the Blueberry pie. I rolled it out, put it in a pie pan, then put it in an XL zip top bag, and then in the freezer. This is using frozen fruit, so it’s an easy bake for a week day. I preheat the oven, bring out the crust, mix up the crumble, then bring together the filling. Dump it in the crust and into the oven.

Unbaked Baked Peach Blueberry Pie
Unbaked Baked Peach Blueberry Pie
Baked Peach Blueberry Pie
Baked Peach Blueberry Pie

Supplies

Bench Vice

Make 10, Week 7

Some day I’d like to either rebuild this cart or build a more traditional work bench. Until then, I’m getting an idea of what is helpful and what is not helpful for me to a work surface. One thing I decided to add last week was a bench vice.

This is an Eclipse 7-inch vice that has a few features that I wanted. I wanted something that mounted to the side of the bench and sat level with the surface. I didn’t want a bench-top model. I also wanted something that I could use to hold a workpiece against a bench dog, and this has a little notch that can pop up for this purpose. I also wanted to screw in some scrap wood to prevent the metal of the vice from marring the surface of a workpiece. Lastly, I like how this vice has a quick release to quickly open and close without working the vice.

I opted for the smaller 7-inch model because it was significantly cheaper and I don’t see myself needing to hold anything much bigger. Plus it just seemed like a small vice would be an easier retro fit into my bench`.

The vice is designed to sit about 2.25-inches from the surface. This means a 2×4 and 3/4-inch bench top fits it perfectly. Since the front of my cart has a 2×4 running vertically, I trimmed down a section with the jigsaw. The cutout isn’t pretty, but it works. Then I screwed in a new 2×4 to lay flat under the bench top. This supports the second bolts for the vice and I have it screwed from the front of the work bench and sides with the side of the bench and middle cross support.

View of vice from under
View of vice from under

I ran four 3/8-inch 4-inch hex bolts through the bench top and secured them with washers and nuts. The rear bolts could actually be shorter since there’s less material in the vice. I made it work just by adding some extra washers rather than another trip to the hardware store. Also, I didn’t have a 3/8 counter-sink bit to have the bolt sit below the bench top. I ended up just making the holes a little bigger with a drill. Doing this, however, I actually over drilled a couple of the holes, so the heads spun freely in those holes. It’s not solid tight, but it works.

The last part was I cut two pieces from 1×4 pine to screw into the vice. I trimmed the height of the board to be flush with the workbench top.

Vice installed
Vice installed

Tip: Make sure to screw in the wood before bolting it down! Another tip, this thing fell off the bench and chipped the paint. Don’t do that either.

Links

End Grain Cutting Board

Make 9, Week 6

I’m planning to make a bunch of different cutting board. I love wooden cutting boards and these seem a good way to learn different skills. Plus they’re relatively small projects so I can finish things. Even better, I can make things to my preferred size.

This board was inspired by a YouTube video. Mine uses maple and walnut in an interesting pattern. My pattern didn’t line up exactly, but it’s functional and looks nice. Next time I’ll need to pay better attention to my cut sizes.

Cutting Board Glue Up
Cutting Board Glue Up

My process was to cut the board into the directed strips. Then glue them together in the directed alternating pattern. Then cut the laminated board across the grain. Then finally glue that together in an alternating pattern. I also clamped a couple board to the top of the glue ups to try and keep the individual boards as level as possible. Lastly, I trimmed the edges with the table saw to make everything even and clean.

I used my planer to smooth the long grain board before the second glue up. Then I used my planer-jointer jig for my router to clean up and level. I then used a straight bit on a router and router guide to make a cutout for easy lifting and also rounded over all the edges with a 1/2-inch roundover bit. Then sanded it down with an orbital sander. Finally, I put rubber feet to give it stability. For the finish, I used John Boos oil and board cream.

 

Routing Finger Slot
Routing Finger Slot
Adding Rubber Feet
Adding Rubber Feet
Finished Board
Finished Board

Next time, I’d want to ensure all boards are the same thickness. Also, take better care to measure the cuts better. Also, I suspect it would help to factor in the width of cuts to the width of the board. I’m not sure how to figure that into something like this design with different board widths.

Links

Router Planer-Jointer Jig

Make 8, Week 6

The goal of this jig is to level edge grain surfaces for cutting boards. Running edge grain through a planer is tempting, but not recommended. I’m not going to risk my new planer, so I’m trying this setup. The idea here is to use a router with a large straight bit to chew through the surface of the wood. To get a level surface, you run the router over the workpiece in a parallel plane.

So, I built a simple sliding platform with a center slot that rides along two rails. I used 3/4 particle board for the bottom and 2x4s for the rails. I ran the 2×4 through the jointer to get them level. In theory, the jointed rails and flat particle board should be parallel to the work surface that’s supporting the workpiece.

Router Planer Jointer Jig
Router Planer Jointer Jig

I glued two sides on top of the jig on the long edge using more particle board. This keeps the router on the jig. I also glued two guides to the bottom of the jig to keep it on the rails. Here I used scrap plywood that I already had cut into strips. At first, I didn’t have these guides, but the vibration of the router makes the jig move laterally and slip off the rails.  For the slot, I measured the diameter of my router bit and cut out a slot in the surface of the jig. To cut, I just drilled some holes and used a jigsaw. It’s nothing fancy or pretty. The critical parts of this jig are the flatness of the bottom and the rails.

Router Planer Jointer Jig Rails Close Up
Router Planer Jointer Jig Rails Close Up
Router Planer Jointer Jig Railes
Router Planer Jointer Jig Rails

To set up the jig, I placed two scrap pieces of wood between the cutting board and rails. Then I clamped it all together to make it stable. For height, I slide the jig on either the long or short side of the glide boards and adjusted the router bit depth as needed. The jig and rails are not attached so that it can handle a variety of sizes. I just need to have a couple pieces of scrap wood to fit between the rails and workpiece. Also, note the burn marks from my table saw. I recently picked up a new saw blade and it’s an amazing difference on hardwood.

Router Planer Jointer Jig Before
Router Planer Jointer Jig Before

In my first attempt, it did the job, but I ended up taking off a lot of material. And it made quite a mess. Next time, I’ll fine tune the technique and setup to get a lighter pass. There was also some machine marks, which isn’t a big deal since it needs to be sanded, but this can probably be improved.

Router Planer Jointer Jig After
Router Planer Jointer Jig After
Router Planer Jointer Jig Finished
Router Planer Jointer Jig Finished

You can make this jig as wide as needed. This one is about two feet, I think. You just want to make it wide enough to accommodate the workpiece and a little buffer so not to run into your rails. (I thought about clamping stops for the router, but I kept it simple and was just mindful of my progress.)

BONUS: My bench jointer can face joint up to 6-inch boards and my planer can thickness plane up to 12-inches, so I’m thinking this jig could be useful if I need to mill larger boards for thickness or straightness.

Links